Expectations for Students

Expectations for students is an umbrella term that links learning outcomes with annotated examples of student work in the subject or short course specification. When teachers, students or parents looking at the online specification scroll through the learning outcomes, a link will sometimes be available to examples of work associated with a specific learning outcome or with a group of learning outcomes. The examples of student work will have been selected to illustrate expectations and will have been annotated by teachers. The examples will include work that is:   

  • Exceptional
  • Above expectations
  • In line with expectations.

The purpose of the examples of student work is to show the extent to which the learning outcomes are being realised in actual cases. Annotated examples of student work judged by teachers will be included alongside the specification.

Learning outcomes
Learning outcomes are statements that describe what knowledge, understanding, skills and values students should be able to demonstrate having studied Junior Cycle History. The learning outcomes set out in the following tables apply to all students. As set out here they represent outcomes for students at the end of their three years of study. The specification stresses that the learning outcomes are for three years and therefore the learning outcomes focused on at a point in time will not have been ‘completed’ but will continue to support the students’ learning in history up to the end of junior cycle.


To support the exploration of the learning outcomes by teachers, parents and students, a glossary of the action verbs used in the specification is included in Appendix A. The outcomes are numbered within each strand. The numbering is intended to support teacher planning in the first instance and does not imply any hierarchy of importance across the outcomes themselves, nor does it suggest an order to which the learning outcomes should be developed in class. Junior Cycle History is offered at a common level. The examples of student work linked to learning outcomes will offer commentary and insights that support differentiation and inclusive classroom practices.

Strand 1: The Nature of History

Strand 1is a formational strand, supporting students to explore the concepts, practise the skills and consider the values and attitudes that inform the discipline of history and the work of the historian.  Strand 1 will help students to acquire a ‘big picture’ of the past and an understanding of the importance of evidence that will enhance their historical consciousness.  Therefore, discrete time can be dedicated to realising learning outcomes.

Strand 1 is also a unifying strand, whereby the learning outcomes can be achieved through engaging with the context provided in strands 2 and 3 in relation to personalities, issues and events.  
It should be noted that strand 1 does not equate to a first year course – the learning outcomes will be realised while engaging with the historical context of strands 2 and 3 over three years.
 

Students learn about

Students should be able to

1. Developing historical conscousness
  1. 1.1

    develop a sense of historical empathy by viewing people, issues and events encountered in their study of the past in their historical context

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  2. 1.2

    consider contentious or controversial issues in history from more than one perspective and discuss the historical roots of a contentious or controversial issue or theme in the contemporary world

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  3. 1.3

    appreciate their cultural inheritance through recognising historically significant places and buildings and discussing why historical personalities, events and issues are commemorated

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  4. 1.4

    demonstrate awareness of historical concepts, such as source and evidence; fact and opinion; viewpoint and objectivity; cause and consequence; change and continuity; time and space

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2. Working with evidence
  1. 1.5

    investigate the job of the historian, including how s/he finds and uses evidence to form historical judgements which may be revised and reinterpreted in the light of new evidence

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  2. 1.6

    debate the usefulness and limitations of different types of primary and secondary sources of historical evidence, such as written, visual, aural, oral and tactile evidence; and appreciate the contribution of archaeology and new technology to historical enquiry

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  3. 1.7

    develop historical judgements based on evidence about personalities, issues and events in the past, showing awareness of historical significance

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  4. 1.8

    investigate a repository of historical evidence such as a museum, library, heritage centre, digital or other archive or exhibition
     

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3. Acquiring 'the big picture'
  1. 1.9

    Demonstrate awareness of the significance of the history of Ireland and of Europe and the wider world across various dimensions, including political, social, economic, religious, cultural and scientific dimensions

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  2. 1.10

    demonstrate chronological awareness by creating and maintaining timelines to locate personalities, issues and events in their appropriate historical eras

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  3. 1.11

    make connections and comparisons between people, issues and events in different places and historical eras
     

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Strand 2: The History of Ireland

Strand 2 is a contextual strand, where students will apply their conceptual understanding and historical skills to an exploration of key personalities, issues and events in Irish history, including local history.

Students learn about

Students should be able to

1. Recognising key change
  1. 2.1

    recognise how a pattern of settlement and plantation influenced identity on the island of Ireland, referring to one example of a pattern of settlement, such as the growth of towns, and one plantation

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  2. 2.2

    investigate the role and significance of two leaders involved in the parliamentary tradition in Irish politics

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  3. 2.3

    explore how the physical force tradition impacted on Irish politics, with particular reference to a pre-twentieth century example of a rebellion

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  4. 2.4

    examine the rise and impact of nationalism and unionism in Ireland, including key events between 1911 and 1923

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  5. 2.5

    identify the causes, course and consequences of the Northern Ireland Troubles and their impact on North-South and Anglo-Irish relations

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2. Exploring people, culture and ideas
  1. 2.6

    consider the historical significance of Christianity on the island of Ireland, including its contribution to culture and society in the Early Christian period

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  2. 2.7

    investigate the causes, course and consequences, nationally and internationally, of the Great Famine, and examine the significance of the Irish Diaspora

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  3. 2.8

    describe the impact of war on the lives of Irish people, referring to either World War One or World War Two

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  4. 2.9

    explain how the experience of women in Irish society changed during the twentieth century

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  5. 2.10

    examine how one sporting, cultural or social movement impacted on Irish life

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3. Applying historical thinking
  1. 2.11

    make connections between local, personal or family history and wider national and/ or international personalities, issues and events

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  2. 2.12

    debate the idea that the 1960s was an important decade on the island of Ireland, referring to relevant personalities, issues and events

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  3. 2.13

    analyse the evolution and development of Ireland’s links with Europe

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Strand 3: The History of Europe and the wider world

Strand 3 is a contextual strand, where students will apply their conceptual understanding and historical skills to an exploration of key personalities, issues and events in the history of Europe and the wider world.

Students learn about

Students should be able to

1. Recognising key change
  1. 3.1

    investigate the lives of people in one ancient or medieval civilisation of their choosing, explaining how the actions and/or achievements of that civilisation contributed to the history of Europe and/or the wider world

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  2. 3.2

    evaluate the impact of conquest and colonisation on people, with particular reference to Portuguese and Spanish exploration

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  3. 3.3

    examine the causes, course and consequences of one revolution in pre-twentieth century Europe and/or the wider world

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  4. 3.4

    discuss the general causes and course of World War One or World War Two and the immediate and long-term impact of the war on people and nations

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  5. 3.5

    recognise the importance of the Cold War in international relations in the twentieth century world

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2. Exploring people, culture and ideas
  1. 3.6

    explore life and death in medieval times

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  2. 3.7

    appreciate change in the fields of the arts and science, with particular reference to the significance of the Renaissance

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  3. 3.8

    consider the historical importance of religion, with particular reference to the Reformation and the actions of one Reformer

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  4. 3.9

    examine life in one fascist country and one communist country in the twentieth century

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  5. 3.10

    explore the significance of genocide, including the causes, course and consequences of the Holocaust
     

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3. Applying historical thinking
  1. 3.11

    explore the contribution of technological developments and innovation to historical change

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  2. 3.12

    evaluate the role of a movement or organisation, such as the European Union or United Nations, in promoting international co-operation, justice and human rights

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  3. 3.13

    debate the idea that the 1960s was an important decade in Europe and the wider world, referring to relevant personalities, issues and events

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  4. 3.14

    illustrate patterns of change across different time periods in a chosen theme relating to life and society (such as, Crime and punishment; Food and drink; Work and leisure; Fashion and appearance or Health and medicine)
     

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